Strength for Battle

“For by you I can run against a troop, and by my God I can leap over a wall.” (Psalm 18:29)

David wrote Psalm 18 as a song to glorify God after he was delivered from his enemies. The description in the Psalm mentioned him being delivered from Saul who was King at the time. Saul had relentlessly pursued David and tried every strategy that he could find to kill him. Despite Saul being King and having all of Israel’s army at his disposal, God protected David and kept him safe.

Saul’s hatred and resentment for David grew out of his strength in battle and David’s ability to slay more enemies than Saul. “And the women sang to one another as they celebrated, “Saul has struck down his thousands, and David his ten thousands.”” (1 Samuel 18:7) This made Saul angry and intimidated by David because he knew that God had rejected him as King. This was due to Saul’s disobedience and God anointed David as King. (1 Samuel 16)

Although David’s anointing was done in private, Saul could see the skill and strength which David displayed on the battlefield. And to add insult to injury, the women made songs about him after the battle which seemed to exalt him above Saul. Despite Saul’s hatred and many attacks against David, he never retaliated but trusted in God to come to his defence.

In the end Saul came under the attack of the Philistines, was badly wounded and then took his own life. (1 Samuel 31) David did not even need to lift his sword against Saul, which he refrained from doing because of his respect for his anointing as King. Today we do not fight with physical weapons, but we fight in the spirit using weapons mighty through God to pull down strongholds. And when we pray, we expect God to win every battle on our behalf.

“the God who gave me vengeance and subdued peoples under me,” (Psalm 18:47)

A.P.-Y.

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